Research Proven Weight Loss: Fruits and Vegetables

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Fruits and vegetables and fruits will help you lose weight.  

Fruits and vegetables at market

Fruits and vegetables at a farmers market

Americans, in general, eat too few fruits nad vegetables.  Fruits and vegetables have several benefits that make them exceptionally beneficial for those trying to lose weight.  They tend to have more fiber than fruit juices but still have the vitamins you need.  

Fruits and vegetables are full of anti-oxidants, vitamins, and minerals[1].  They are less dense in calories and have lots of fiber and are rich in water which results in a lower energy density and slows the absorption of the calories.  They also take a lot of effort to chew and are quite filling.  Besides nutrition, there are also weight and body fat effects.  

Research on fruits and vegetables:

Low levels of fruits and vegetables increase the risk of obesity.  One great study from 2009 by Buijsse found that weight and fruit and vegetable consumption are inversely related[2].  So, in other words, the less a person eats of fruits and vegetables, the more likely they are to be obese.  In fact, they found that for each 100 grams of fruit and vegetable intake per 24 hours resulted in 14 grams of less weight gained.  Another study that confirmed was performed by Ledoux in 2011 and found an inverse relationship between the serving of fruits in vegetables in your diet and obesity[3].  This makes sense because vegetables then to slow digestion with their fiber and if a person does not eat many servings of fruits and vegetables, they are probably replacing it with starches and fats which are more likely to pack on the pounds.  Other studies have also found this relationship and I have yet to find a single professional that feels increased vegetables and fruits will not reduce your risk of obesity[4],[5].  

Footnotes
[1]Slavin and Lloyd, “Health Benefits of Fruits and Vegetables.”
[2]Buijsse et al., “Fruit and Vegetable Intakes and Subsequent Changes in Body Weight in European Populations: Results from the Project on Diet, Obesity, and Genes (DiOGenes).”
[3]Ledoux, Hingle, and Baranowski, “Relationship of Fruit and Vegetable Intake with Adiposity: A Systematic Review.”
[4]He et al., “Changes in Intake of Fruits and Vegetables in Relation to Risk of Obesity and Weight Gain among Middle-Aged Women.”
[5]Field et al., “Association between Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Change in Body Mass Index among a Large Sample of Children and Adolescents in the United States.”
Buijsse, B, EJ Feskens, MB Schulze, NG Forouhi, NJ Wareham, S Sharp, D Palli, et al. “Fruit and Vegetable Intakes and Subsequent Changes in Body Weight in European Populations: Results from the Project on Diet, Obesity, and Genes (DiOGenes).” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 90, no. 1 (July 1, 2009): 202–9. [PubMed]
Field, AE, MW Gillman, B Rosner, HR Rockett, and GA Colditz. “Association between Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Change in Body Mass Index among a Large Sample of Children and Adolescents in the United States.” International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders : Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity 27, no. 7 (July 1, 2003): 821–26. [PubMed]
He, K, FB Hu, GA Colditz, JE Manson, WC Willett, and S Liu. “Changes in Intake of Fruits and Vegetables in Relation to Risk of Obesity and Weight Gain among Middle-Aged Women.” International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders : Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity 28, no. 12 (December 1, 2004): 1569–74. [PubMed]
Ledoux, TA, MD Hingle, and T Baranowski. “Relationship of Fruit and Vegetable Intake with Adiposity: A Systematic Review.” Obesity Reviews : An Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity 12, no. 5 (May 1, 2011): e143-50. [PubMed]
Slavin, JL, and B Lloyd. “Health Benefits of Fruits and Vegetables.” Advances in Nutrition (Bethesda, Md.) 3, no. 4 (July 1, 2012): 506–16. [PubMed]
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About the Author

ChuckH

I am a family physician who has served in the US Army. In 2016, I found myself overweight, out of shape, and unhealthy, so I made a change to improve my health. This blog is the chronology of my path to better health and what I have learned along the way.

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